Aug 13, 2022  
2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 
  
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    ACCT 101 - Accounting Principles I


    Credits: (3)
    A study of fundamental accounting principles, accumulation of financial data, preparation of financial statements and the use and interpretation of financial statements. (Fall and Spring)
  
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    ACCT 102 - Accounting Principles II


    Credits: (3)
    This course continues a review of financial accounting principles. Fundamentals of managerial accounting are addressed in the second part of the semester. Prerequisite(s): ACCT 101 . (Fall and Spring)
  
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    ACCT 201 - Intermediate Accounting I


    Credits: (3)
    The study of generally accepted accounting principles with emphasis on the theoretical aspects of modern public accounting. Prerequisite(s): ACCT 101  and ACCT 102 . (Fall)
  
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    ACCT 202 - Intermediate Accounting II


    Credits: (3)
    The study of generally accepted accounting principles with emphasis on the theoretical aspects of modern public accounting. Prerequisite(s): ACCT 101  and ACCT 102 . (Spring)
  
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    ACCT 301 - Cost Accounting


    Credits: (3)
    The essentials of cost accounting for the accounting professional. A study of cost behavior, standard costs for product costing and control, job order and process costing, activity based costing, variance analysis, cost-volume-profit analysis and the master budget. Prerequisite(s): ACCT 201 . (Fall)
  
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    ACCT 303 - Advanced Accounting I


    Credits: (3)
    A study of governmental and non-profit accounting procedures used in the preparation of governmental and non-profit financial statements as well as a study of partnership and business combination accounting procedures used in the preparation of partnership and consolidated financial statements. The role of the Securities and Exchange Commission in today’s modern public accounting is also examined. Prerequisite(s): ACCT 201 -ACCT 202 . (Spring)
  
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    ACCT 310 - Accounting Information Systems


    Credits: (3)
    A systems approach to accounting information with emphasis on computer-based accounting information systems (AIS). Includes technical aspects of AIS, transaction cycles, system development and implementation, internal control, and auditing in a computer environment. Prerequisite(s): ACCT 101 . (Fall and Spring)
  
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    ACCT 311 - Forensic Accounting and Fraud Examination


    Credits: (3)
    This course is an introduction to the practice of forensic accounting and will examine the role of the forensic accountant in investigating fraudulent financial reporting and misappropriation of assets including the various schemes involved in financial statement fraud, theft, embezzlement, procurement and disbursements fraud, and money laundering. The course will emphasize the tools and techniques used by forensic accountants to detect and investigate these various frauds including digital analysis and other computer-based applications. Students will also read and study actual case studies and apply the principles learned in this course to the fraud schemes perpetrated. Prerequisite(s): ACCT 101  and ACCT 102 . (Fall and Spring)
  
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    ACCT 312 - Forensic Accounting and Litigation Advisory Services


    Credits: (3)
    This course explores the litigation advisory services discipline of forensic accounting, including the various litigation support services and expert testimony provided by forensic accountants. The course will focus on the U.S. civil court system; commercial claims, torts, and intellectual property damages; and how forensic accountants compute economic losses and damages. In addition, the course will examine the forensic accountant’s role in conducting business valuations and analysis. The course also explores proper evidence management, including a brief introduction to investigating electronic evidence, performing digital forensic analysis, and the role of the digital forensic specialist. Students will study actual case studies and apply the principles learned related with these forensic disciplines. Students will study actual case studies and apply the principles learned related with these forensic disciplines. Prerequisite(s): ACCT 101  and ACCT 102 . (Fall and Spring)
  
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    ACCT 398 - Independent Study


    Credits: (1-3)
    Permission of the instructor, the department chair, dean of the school/college and the associate provost is required. (As needed)
  
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    ACCT 399 - ST: Special Topics in Accounting


    Credits: (3)
    Study of special topics in Accounting. Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor. (As needed)
  
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    ACCT 401 - Federal Income Tax


    Credits: (3)
    A study of federal income tax laws with particular emphasis on their application to individuals. Tax research, planning and ethics will be integrated into and emphasized throughout the course. Prerequisite(s): ACCT 201 . (Spring)
  
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    ACCT 405 - Auditing


    Credits: (3)
    An introductory course in auditing. Includes the study of auditing concepts and methods including reporting requirements, professional ethics and legal liability issues, audit objectives and evidence, planning and documentation, and the analysis and study of materiality and risks, as well as internal control systems. Prerequisite(s): ACCT 201 -ACCT 202 . (Fall)
  
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    ACCT 413 - Introduction to Forensic Data Analytics and Electronic Evidence


    Credits: (3)
    This course examines the use of the computer and technology by both the perpetrators of fraud and other crimes along with how forensic accountants use the computer and technology as a means to detect and prosecute fraud and abuse. Students will lean and utilize modern forensic tools, techniques and computer-based applications used by forensic accountants in fraud investigations and other forensic work. Students will work with case studies and related data sets using certain forensic applications to uncover potential fraudulent transactions and information to aid in forensic investigations. A general working knowledge of Microsoft Excel and computers is required. Prerequisite(s): ACCT 311  or ACCT 312  
  
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    ACCT 414 - Communication Skills for Forensic Accountants


    Credits: (3)
    This course will focus on building verbal and written skills applicable to forensic accountants and used in forensic accounting engagements. Topics will include proper interviewing techniques, report writing, providing expert witness services at deposition and trial, supervising a team of forensic accountants, and communications and interactions of the forensic accountant with the legal and law enforcement community. The course will also examine the various laws and legal issues associated with conducting fraud investigations and other forensic accounting services. Students will perform mock interviews, deposition and trial testimony, and submit a written forensic report based on a contemporary case study. Prerequisite(s): ACCT 311  or ACCT 312   (Spring)
  
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    ACCT 415 - Special Topics in Forensic Accounting


    Credits: (3)
    This course integrates the skills, knowledge, principles, and theories learned in the forensic program and applies them to more advanced topic areas such as, forensic and fraud investigative techniques, digital forensic analysis, fraudulent financial reporting, white-collar criminal behavior, litigation support and commercial damages, expert testimony and report writing, and business valuations. Students will focus on an area of special interest to them and develop an independent study program for the course with the professor. Independent study activities may involve internships, completing self-study courses sponsored by relevant organizations, study and completion of requirements for the CFE exam, among others. Students will also select a relevant topic or case study in their area of choice, and write and present a comprehensive analytical paper. The study of forensic accounting provides an excellent opportunity to develop capstone experiences and integrate skills developed in the fraud and forensic accounting specialty areas that the student wishes to pursue in their career. Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of ACCT 311 , ACCT 312 , ACCT 413 , and ACCT 414 , and permission of program director. (Spring)
  
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    ACCT 424 - Advanced Auditing II


    Credits: (3)
    A study of auditing concepts and methods, emphasizing those issues most frequently encountered by the firm and external auditors. Prerequisite(s): ACCT 405  (Spring)
  
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    ACCT 426 - Accounting Theory and Practice


    Credits: (3)
    This course is an elective for accounting majors. It is specifically designed for those students who intend to take the CPA exam. The course is delivered online (on a pass/fail basis) and covers all subject matter addressed on the CPA exam. (Spring)
  
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    ACCT 480 - Internship


    Credits: (1-12)
    Opportunities for students to engage in practical application of accounting theory. Permission of the department chair. (As needed)
  
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    AMER 202 - America in the World


    Credits: (3)
    America in the World encourages students to think seriously about the role of America in the world, from the Age of Encounter to today. Students pose questions about how the United States grew to an international power; how Americans have understood themselves over the centuries; how the spread of “American values” has impacted the modern world; and how individuals, events, and processes from around the world have affected American life.
  
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    ARBC 101 - Beginning Arabic I Through French


    Credits: (1)
    The series of these two introductory courses equaling 3 credits (101, 102) serve to initiate students in the study of Modern Standard Arabic (MSA) and the cultures where Arabic is spoken. In these courses, students will learn to read and write the Arabic alphabet, to speak simple words and phrases, and to enter into simple conversations while reinforcing French language skills. Student will also develop cultural literacy centered on the region especially in those Middle Eastern areas where French is spoken. The language of instruction in this course is both French and Arabic. Students are required to be enrolled in or have taken FREN 201 Intermediate French I (3)  or the equivalent in order to participate in this course of study since the texts for Arabic instruction will be in French. These Arabic courses are designed to fulfill the major in French with a concentration in Middle Eastern studies. Prerequisite(s): FREN 201 Intermediate French I (3)  or equivalent.
  
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    ARBC 102 - Beginning Arabic II Through French


    Credits: (2)
    The series of these two introductory courses equaling 3 credits (101, 102) serve to initiate students in the study of Modern Standard Arabic (MSA) and the cultures where Arabic is spoken. In these courses, students will learn to read and write the Arabic alphabet, to speak simple words and phrases, and to enter into simple conversations while reinforcing French language skills. Student will also develop cultural literacy centered on the region especially in those Middle Eastern areas where French is spoken. The language of instruction in this course is both French and Arabic. Students are required to be enrolled in or have taken FREN 201 Intermediate French I (3)  or the equivalent in order to participate in this course of study since the texts for Arabic instruction will be in French. These Arabic courses are designed to fulfill the major in French with a concentration in Middle Eastern studies. Prerequisite(s): FREN 201 Intermediate French I (3)  or equivalent.
  
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    ARBC 103 - Beginning Arabic III Through French


    Credits: (3)
    This introductory course is aimed at developing basic communicative proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic (MSA) and also offer insight into cultures where Arabic is spoken. The language of instruction in this course is both French and Arabic. Students are required to be enrolled in or have taken FREN 201 Intermediate French I (3)  or the equivalent in order to participate in this course of study since the texts for Arabic instruction will be in French. These Arabic courses are designed to fulfill the major in French with a concentration in Middle Eastern studies. Prerequisite(s): FREN 201 Intermediate French I (3)  or equivalent & ARBC 101-103 or Equivalent (As needed)
  
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    ARHI - - Arts, Humanities, History, Language


    Credits: (3)
    Students fulfill this requirement with a course in arts and humanities, history, or language.
  
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    ARMO 300 - Modernity in Visual Art


    Credits: (3)
    Critical study of modernity and key ideas and forces that have shaped the modern world as reflected through the discipline of art. Prerequisite(s): Rising Junior Status or higher (45 earned credits) (Fall and Spring)
  
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    ARTS - - Art, Literature, Music, Theatre


    Credits: (3)
    Students fulfill this requirement by taking courses in a variety of liberal arts and humanities fields. Acceptable courses include art, literature, music theory, music history, and theatre.
  
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    ASL 101 - Beginning American Sign Language I


    Credits: (3)
    These introductory courses are aimed at developing basic communicative proficiency in American Sign Language and also offer insight into Deaf culture and Deaf community. This course does not fulfill the university core language requirement. (Fall)
  
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    ASL 102 - Beginning American Sign Language II


    Credits: (3)
    These introductory courses are aimed at developing basic communicative proficiency in American Sign Language and also offer insight into Deaf culture and Deaf community. This course does not fulfill the university core language requirement. Prerequisite(s): ASL 101   (Spring)
  
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    BIOCH 405 - Biochemistry I


    Credits: (4)
    Introductory course in the fundamentals of biological chemistry including a study of all phases of metabolism; problem solving in acid-base equilibria and buffers; and an introduction to the fundamentals of energetics of biochemical reactions and enzyme kinetics. This course fulfills the Molecular and Cellular Biology area requirement in the Biology major. Lecture and lab. Prerequisite(s): BIWI 221; CHEM 201 -CHEM 202  (C-grade or higher). (Fall)
  
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    BIOCH 406 - Biochemistry II


    Credits: (4)
    A study of biochemical principles designed to build on the fundamental principles learned in Biochemistry I. The course will take an integrative approach to the study of metabolic pathways including protein degradation and amino acid catabolism, glycogen metabolism, and other biosynthetic pathways. Emphasis will be placed on enzyme mechanisms and regulatory events. Lecture and Lab. Recommended for biochemistry majors. Prerequisite(s): BIOCH 405  (C-grade or higher) (Spring)
  
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    BIOL 100 - Research in Biotechnology


    Credits: (4)
    Students carry out research in biotechnology by designing experiments, carrying them out, analyzing and reporting their findings.
  
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    BIOL 110 - Introduction to Biology I


    Credits: (4)
    Designed to provide a broad background as preparation for further studies in the discipline. Familiarizes the student with the major levels and unifying principles of biological organization. Topics covered include evolution, biodiversity and ecology. Lecture and lab. (Fall)
  
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    BIOL 111 - Introduction to Biology II


    Credits: (4)
    A continuation of Introduction to Biology I. Topics covered include cellular and subcellular structure and function, metabolic processes, and genetics. Lecture and lab. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 110 Introduction to Biology I (4)  must be passed with a grade of C- or higher. (Spring).
  
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    BIOL 200 - Invertebrate Zoology


    Credits: (4)
    A comparative study of invertebrate animals, with a primary focus on the insects and other arthropods. This course provides a detailed study of the invertebrates: anatomy and physiology, behavior, and relationships with plants and other animals, including any medical importance to humans. This course fulfills the Ecology and Evolution area requirement in the Biology major. Integrated lecture and lab. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 110 Introduction to Biology I (4)  -BIOL 111 Introduction to Biology II (4)  (must maintain a grade of C- or higher). (Fall, even years)
  
  
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    BIOL 208 - Nutrition


    Credits: (3)
    This course introduces the basic concepts human nutrition, including basic biochemical principles of food, digestion and absorption. The course then delves into medical and public health concepts such as disease prevention and management in regards to nutrition. This course is offered as a hybrid class with classroom and on-line lectures, discussions, and exercises. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 110 Introduction to Biology I (4)  - BIOL 111 Introduction to Biology II (4)  or permission of the Instructor. (Spring)
  
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    BIOL 209 - Medical Terminology


    Credits: (2)
    Online This online course covers medical terms related to all major body systems. Students will learn correct spelling, pronunciation, and building blocks of medical terminology including roots, prefixes, suffixes, and abbreviations. This course will offer students a strong grasp of the technical language of medicine in preparation for careers in medical science. (Spring)
  
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    BIOL 221 - Genetics


    Credits: (4)
    An introduction to the principles and mechanisms of heredity with an emphasis on classical Mendelian genetics. Other topics include molecular genetics and functional genomics. Elementary statistical methods will be employed with the laboratory component of the course focusing on experimental design using yeast as a model organism. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 110 Introduction to Biology I (4)  -BIOL 111 Introduction to Biology II (4)  (Must maintain a grade of C- or higher). (Fall and Spring)
  
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    BIOL 225 - Environmental Science


    Credits: (4)
    An introductory survey of the interdisciplinary field of environmental science, studying the biological, chemical and physical principles of ecosystem structure and function in order to understand and appreciate human impacts on natural systems. Topics include human population growth, preservation of biodiversity, sustainable agriculture, resource management, climate change, energy use and pollution. The laboratory will emphasize research techniques in environmental science and methods for environmental monitoring. This course fulfills the Ecology and Evolution area requirement in the Biology major. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 110 Introduction to Biology I (4)  -BIOL 111 Introduction to Biology II (4)  or permission of instructor. (Spring, even years)
  
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    BIOL 245 - Epidemiology


    Credits: (4)
    This is an introduction to the basic concepts of epidemiology including data collection, data interpretation, experimental design, bias, confounding variables, incidence, and prevalence. This course will build skills universally applicable to numerous fields of scientific research with regards to distilling the research question, experimental design, and data analysis. Students will have real discussions about how epidemiological data are used to: predict outbreaks and track outbreak sources; observe and analyze disease trends on a local, national, and global scale; and make policy with regards to public health. Lecture. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 110 Introduction to Biology I (4)  -BIOL 111 Introduction to Biology II (4)  . (As needed)
  
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    BIOL 250 - Animal Behavior


    Credits: (4)
    An exploration of the interactions of animals with their environment and with other animals, within the framework of evolution and natural selection. Topics such as foraging behavior, learning and memory, anti-predator behavior, reproductive behavior, social behavior, and communication will be studied in a wide range of animal taxa. Methodological approaches to observational and experimental studies of behavior both in the lab and in the field will be emphasized. This course fulfills the Ecology and Evolution area requirement in the Biology major. Lecture and lab. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 221 Genetics (4)  (Must maintain a grade of C- or higher) or instructor permission. (Spring, even years)
  
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    BIOL 260 - Topics in Biotechnology


    Credits: (3)
    Introductory course with topics covering many aspects of biotechnology, including those that relate to animals, microbes, human health, agriculture and the environment. Students will learn about the modern process of drug development, from the early stage of target identification and generation of lead compounds to regulatory approval, and the role of biotechnology in this complex process. Finally, the course will explore the various careers in biotechnology such as research and development, quality control and quality assurance, regulatory affairs, and patent development. Lecture only. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 221 Genetics (4)  , CHEM 201 Organic Chemistry I (4)  -CHEM 202 Organic Chemistry II (4) . (As needed)
  
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    BIOL 298 - Anatomy and Physiology I


    Credits: (4)
    This course is the first of a two part sequence that examines the structure and function of human tissues, organs, and organ systems. Topics include the integument, skeletal system, muscular system, and nervous system. The accompanying laboratory will explore these topics in a dissection based approach, coupled with physiological lab experiments. This course fulfills the Organismal area requirement in the Biology major. Lecture and lab. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 110 Introduction to Biology I (4)  -BIOL 111 Introduction to Biology II (4)  , CHEM 101 General Chemistry I (4)  (CHEM 101 General Chemistry I (4)  can be taken concurrently). (Fall and Spring)
  
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    BIOL 299 - Anatomy and Physiology II


    Credits: (4)
    This course is the second of a two part sequence that examines the structure and function of human tissues, organs, and organ systems. Topics include the cardiovascular system, digestive system, endocrine system, urinary system, respiratory system, and reproductive system. The accompanying laboratory will explore these topics in a dissection based approach, coupled with physiological lab experiments. This course fulfills the Organismal area requirement in the Biology major. Lecture and lab. Prerequisite(s): Must maintain a grade of C- or higher in BIOL 298 Anatomy and Physiology I (4) . (Fall and Spring)
  
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    BIOL 300 - Microbiology


    Credits: (4)
    A fundamental course that examines microorganisms, their role in human disease and application in molecular biology. In this combined lab and lecture course, students will investigate growth, reproductive, metabolic and structural characteristics of bacteria and viruses. They will also study the classification of microbes and develop an understanding of their potential to cause human disease. This course fulfills the Organismal area requirement in the Biology major. Integrated lecture and lab. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 101 General Chemistry I (4)  -CHEM 102 General Chemistry II (4)  or CHEM 101 General Chemistry I (4)  -CHEM 150 Bioorganic Chemistry (4)   (Spring)
  
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    BIOL 311 - Pharmacology


    Credits: (4)
    Introductory course in Pharmacology, a scientific discipline that focuses on how drugs affect biological systems. The pharmacological basis of therapeutics will be discussed in the context of the principles of drug action and the mechanism of action of representative agents, with emphasis on the molecular and cellular aspects. Major concepts to be explored include: pharmacokinetics, drug metabolism, dose-response relationships, and resistance. Other topics will discuss the chemistry, mechanism of action and pharmacologic action of drugs affecting the autonomic and central nervous systems, the cardiovascular, renal, and endocrine systems, pathogenic microbes, and cancer. Integrated lecture and lab. This course fulfills the Molecular and Cellular Biology area requirement in the Biology major. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 110 Introduction to Biology I (4)  -BIOL 111 Introduction to Biology II (4)  , CHEM 201 Organic Chemistry I (4)  or CHEM 150 Bioorganic Chemistry (4)  (Must maintain a grade of C- or higher). (Fall, even years)
  
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    BIOL 312 - Plant Ecology


    Credits: (4)
    Plants are dynamic models for exploring basic ecological theory, and plant ecology as a discipline is poised to apply basic ecology to address contemporary environmental problems, such as managing invasive and rare species populations and handling pollinator declines as a threat to biodiversity and agriculture. This course is designed to provide an in-depth exploration of plants and their unique solutions to ecological pressures encountered within their populations, communities and ecosystems. Lecture periods will focus on introducing and defining key plant ecology concepts and terms through traditional lectures in combination with student-led discussions and small group problem-solving activities. During the lab meetings, we will employ plant ecology methods to answer questions and gain experience in the scientific method. Students will complete the course with a toolkit of techniques for effective scientific study from their experiences reading, writing and talking about plant ecology and doing plant ecology in the lab and field. Lecture and Lab. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 110 Introduction to Biology I (4)  -BIOL 111 Introduction to Biology II (4)   (Spring, odd years)
  
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    BIOL 314 - Virology


    Credits: (4)
    This course is an introductory study of the major families of plant, bacterial, and animal viruses. Lecture topics include virus structure, replication cycles, use of viruses as research tools, and the role of viruses in disease. Prions, viroids, and virophage are also discussed. Laboratory utilizes 1) bacteriophage to emphasize the organismal aspects of viruses, and 2) animal virus to demonstrate the use of viruses in research and molecular biology. This course fulfills the Molecular and Cellular Biology area requirement in the Biology major. Integrated lecture and lab. Prerequisite(s):  CHEM 101 General Chemistry I (4)  -CHEM 102 General Chemistry II (4)   (Fall, odd years)
  
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    BIOL 315 - Immunology


    Credits: (4)
    An overview of specific and nonspecific immunity, structure and function of immunoglobulins, molecular basis of antibody diversity, T cell and B cell differentiation, cell-cell interactions in the immune response, humoral and cell-mediated immunity, lymphokines and mediators, immunogenetics and major histocompatibility complexes, complement, inflammation, hypersensitivity, autoimmune and immunodeficiency diseases, tumor immunology and transplantation immunology are among the topics discussed. This course fulfills the Molecular and Cellular Biology area requirement in the Biology major. Integrated lecture and lab. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 101 General Chemistry I (4)  -CHEM 102 General Chemistry II (4)  (Fall, even years)
  
  
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    BIOL 325 - Ecology


    Credits: (4)
    Examines the principles of population and community ecology and explores the interactions affecting the distribution and abundance of organisms. The laboratory component focuses on learning basic ecological methods and applying these methods to design and implement in-depth studies of selected ecological problems. This course fulfills the Ecology and Evolution Biology area requirement in the Biology major. Lecture and lab. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 221 Genetics (4)   or permission of the instructor. (Fall, odd years).
  
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    BIOL 335 - Pathophysiology


    Credits: (4)
    An in depth study of the pathological processes that underlie human disease states. Emphasis will be placed on understanding mechanisms through which pathological states disrupt normal body homeostasis. Designed as a capstone course for those interested in health professions. This course fulfills the Organismal area requirement in the Biology major. Lecture and lab. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 298 Anatomy and Physiology I (4)  -BIOL 299 Anatomy and Physiology II (4)  . (Spring, odd years)
  
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    BIOL 340 - Conservation Biology


    Credits: (3)
    Current and historical concepts in the field of conservation biology and wildlife management will be introduced and discussed. Students will learn about dynamics of small populations, the plight of endangered species, causes of extinction, and historical developments in conservation. Methods of conservation and preservation to protect species and habitat will be analyzed. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 221 Genetics (4)  or permission of the instructor. (Spring, even years)
  
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    BIOL 370 - Introduction to Neuroscience


    This course, offered through the Department of Psychology, covers the fundamentals of neuronal communication, including the physiology of neuronal responses, the actions of neurotransmitters, and the genetic and cell biological components of neuronal development and plasticity. Applies the understanding of neuronal communication to both human and non-human behaviors and processes.

      Prerequisite(s): BIOL 110 Introduction to Biology I (4)  PSYCH 100 Foundations of Psychology (3)   Suggested: BIOL 111 Introduction to Biology II (4)   Cross-listed: NEURO 370 Methods in Neuroscience (3)  
    This course counts as a 3 credit biology elective for biology majors; however,it does not fulfill a biology area requirement.

  
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    BIOL 398 - Independent Study


    Credits: (1-3)
    Student selects a topic for study and surveys the literature, performs laboratory investigations or other activities and submits a written report. Permission of the instructor, and Department Chair. Overall GPA of 2.5 and GPA of 2.0 in the major are required. (As needed)
  
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    BIOL 400 - Toxicology


    Credits: (4)
    A discussion of drugs and poisons, the chemicals that affect living systems. Students will study how such chemicals produce their effects, as well as the mechanisms of exposure and metabolism of biologically active chemicals, particularly those that result in chronic illness. Topics include pharmacology (study of medicines), physiology of toxicant effects and detoxication, and ecotoxicology (the behavior of toxicants in the environment). This course fulfills the Organismal area requirement in the Biology major. Lecture and lab. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 221 Genetics (4)  and CHEM 202 Organic Chemistry II (4)  (or concurrent). (As needed)
  
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    BIOL 406 - Evolution


    Credits: (4)
    A study of evolutionary theory and the evolutionary history of life. Topics include the historical development of evolutionary theory, mechanisms of evolutionary change, population genetics, and phylogenetics. Hypothesis testing and research techniques in evolutionary biology will also be explored. This course fulfills the Ecology and Evolution area requirement in the Biology major. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 221 Genetics (4)  , CHEM 201 Organic Chemistry I (4)  -CHEM 202 Organic Chemistry II (4)  (or concurrent). Junior or senior standing required. (Spring, odd years)
  
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    BIOL 410 - Seminar


    Credits: (1)
    Students will choose a focused topic in modern biological research, conduct a search for and evaluate primary literature related to the topic, and present a literature review of the topic in an oral presentation. Students will also gain experience receiving and giving feedback on practice presentations. This course provides students an opportunity to develop and practice the critical thinking and communication skills required in science. Lecture only. Required for senior biology majors. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 110 Introduction to Biology I (4)  -BIOL 111 Introduction to Biology II (4)  . BIOL 450 Undergraduate Research Experience (1-4)  and BIHP 471(HONORS) may be substituted for BIOL 410 Seminar with the permission of the department chair. (Fall and Spring)
  
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    BIOL 415 - Watershed Ecology


    Credits: (4)
    A holistic and interdisciplinary exploration of aquatic ecosystems (lakes, streams and estuaries) with an emphasis on the linkages between land and water. Students will investigate the ecological relationships, the biological communities, the geochemical dynamics, the environmental pollution and management of local watersheds through readings, lecture and research. In the laboratory students will conduct research to answer novel questions, explore aquatic ecosystems first-hand on field trips, and learn important laboratory techniques for monitoring watersheds. This course fulfills the Ecology and Evolution area requirement in the Biology major. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 221 Genetics (4)   and CHEM 101 General Chemistry I (4)  -CHEM 102 General Chemistry II (4) . (As needed)
  
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    BIOL 420 - Molecular and Cellular Biology


    Credits: (4)
    Examines the molecular and cellular processes that enable cells to have certain structural and functional roles within an organism. Both microbial and animal cells will be studied with respect to chemical composition, function of organelles, cell division, gene expression and cellular interactions. The lab emphasizes techniques such as tissue culture, cellular transformation, DNA isolation and characterization, protein synthesis and recombinant DNA technology. This course fulfills the Molecular and Cellular area requirement in the Biology major. Integrated lecture and lab. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 221 Genetics (4)   and CHEM 201 Organic Chemistry I (4)  . (Fall, odd years)
  
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    BIOL 435 - Cancer Biology


    Credits: (4)
    Utilizes lecture, experimentation and experimental/clinical scenarios to examine both the clinical and molecular aspects of tumorigenesis. Topics of discussion may include cancer development and progression, oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, cell cycle control, apoptosis, angiogenesis, cell migration/metastasis, and the immune response to cancer. Integrated lecture and lab. This course fulfills the Molecular and Cellular area requirement in the Biology major. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 221 Genetics (4)   and CHEM 201 Organic Chemistry I (4) . (Fall, even years)
  
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    BIOL 450 - Undergraduate Research Experience


    Credits: (1-4)
    An independent research project planned and executed by the student in conjunction with a faculty mentor; generally allied with the faculty mentor’s own research. Overall GPA of 2.5 and a GPA of 2.0 in the major are required. (As needed)
  
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    BIOL 460 - ST: Special Topics in Biology


    Credits: (1)
    A study of specialized areas of modern biology. Lecture and lab. Permission of the department chair required. (As needed)
  
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    BIOL 480 - Internship


    Credits: (1-4)
    Opportunities to gain practical experience in an off-campus program. The nature of the work experience and the number of credits must be approved in advance by the department chair. (As needed)
  
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    BIOL 510 - Protein Biochemistry


    Credits: (3)
    This course explores the structure-function relationship of biologically important proteins. The role of proteins in cell structure, metabolism, transport, and signal transduction will be examined. Specific topics include: protein biosynthesis, protein structure, protein folding, protein-protein interactions, receptor-ligand binding, GTP-binding proteins, enzymes, and signal transduction. Prerequisite(s): Permission of Dean.
  
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    BIOL 520 - Molecular Genetics


    Credits: (3)
    This course explores the expression and regulation of genes at the molecular level, focusing on gene structure and function as well as transcriptional and translational control of gene expression. Special emphasis will be placed on understanding how molecular biology has revolutionized the understanding of human gene function and the molecular basis of disease. Prerequisite(s): Permission of Dean
  
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    BIOL 620 - Biotechnology and FDA Regulations


    Credits: (3)
    This course introduces students to the laws governing FDA-regulated industries with particular focus on the pharmaceutical and medical device industries. Students will gain an understanding of how to navigate through the process of FDA approval of potential new therapeutics and will gain an appreciation of general business law, and FDA and ICH regulations and guidelines.
  
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    BUS 127 - Introduction to Sport Management


    Credits: (3)
    An examination of the diverse and expanding field of sports and recreation. Designed to provide a comprehensive look at the basic organizational structures found in the sport industry. Students examine applications of managerial concepts and processes and the ways in which organizations interact with each other and with the government. (Fall and Spring)
  
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    BUS 201 - Business Law I


    Credits: (3)
    Introduction to legal rights and remedies. An analysis and study of the law of contracts, agency, employment, negotiable instruments, personal property, sales and insurance. (Fall and Spring)
  
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    BUS 202 - Business Law II


    Credits: (3)
    Introduction to legal rights and remedies. An analysis and study of the law of contracts, agency, employment, negotiable instruments, personal property, sales and insurance. Prerequisite(s): BUS 201 Business Law I (3)   (Spring)
  
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    BUS 225 - Technology Skills for Business


    Credits: (1)
    BUS 225 is a one-credit course that will focus primarily on the use of MS Excel in the Business environment. Elementary, Intermediate and Advanced topics will be covered, including creation of single, multiple and linked worksheets; formulas; statistical and financial functions; import and export of data to and from Word, PowerPoint, Access and XML; formatting; charts and pivot tables; scenario manager; and, other special topics relating to the use of MS Excel. Brief use of MS Word and MS Access will also be covered as time permits. Students should take this course within the first three semesters of enrollment. (Fall and Spring)
  
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    BUS 245 - Internship Preparation


    Credits: (1)
    This course is open to all students, particularly those planning to complete an internship within the next year and improve upon career development skills.  It is sponsored by the Career Center and the Richard J. Bolte, Sr. School of Business to aid students in identifying, exploring and preparing for their internship and career experiences. The course will address matters pertaining to internship concepts, career planning and development, internship searches, ethical issues, resume and cover letter writing, interviewing skills, networking, and current events. The course aims to equip students with knowledge and skills to participate thoughtfully with career matters, understand decision-making processes, reflect on the personal journeys of individuals, and exercise new levels of self-awareness. 
  
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    BUS 250 - Introduction to Business and Decision Making


    Credits: (3)
    An exploration into the world of contemporary business from entrepreneurship and small business development, to legal structure, finance, going global, data science, management, marketing, operations, and more. Students discover how problem solving and critical thinking are applied to decision making. The course is a valuable foundation for sophomores and juniors preparing for 300- and 400- level business courses. (Fall and Spring)
  
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    BUS 260 - Business Communication


    Credits: (3)
    Communication skills are often among the highest-ranked of employer-requested competencies, and in today’s world of flatter organizations, increased technology, and global relations, excellent communication skills are essential. This course is designed to aid the student in developing the following professional business skills: written communication, oral presentation, interpersonal skills, and team effectiveness. Preference will be given to students in their sophomore year majoring in Sport Management and students in their senior year majoring in Business with Management concentration. (Spring)
  
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    BUS 261 - Business Communication: Written and Oral


    Credits: (3)
    Communication skills are often among the highest-ranked of employer-requested competencies. In today’s world of flatter organizations, increased technology, and global relations, excellent communication skills are essential. This course is a continuation of the Business Communications course with a focused study of business communications within the Federal Acquisition Field, including documents, reports, and communication formats utilized within this field. (Spring)
  
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    BUS 270 - Cyberethics


    Credits: (3)
    In BUS 270 students will explore the ethical ramifications of the computer age, including the Internet, the Web, privacy, computer monitoring, intellectual property, personal information, freedom of speech, computer crime, computers in the workplace and profession ethics and responsibilities. Ethical foundations will include those of importance to the Western Christian tradition, such as Holy Scripture, Catholic Social Teaching, current documents from the Vatican and the Evangelical Ethic; professional statements such as the ACM Code of Ethics and the Software Engineering Code will also be examined. There will be heavy emphasis on specific cases and in the assessment of actions in light of the foundational ethical principles presented. Students will write a variety of formal and informal essays and a research paper. (As needed)
  
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    BUS 305 - Culturally Diverse Workforce


    Credits: (3)
    This course examines the challenges and opportunities of diversity. The course begins with an introduction to diversity, some of the views and myths associated with it, and the changes and trends of diversity in the United States. Students will explore cross-cultural communication, building and sustaining multi-cultural work teams, and the range of cultural behaviors and expectations. Students will also look at ways that diversity can be integrated into an organization through the corporate culture, diversity audits and programs, recruitment and reward systems. The course will focus on cultural awareness and understanding on both a personal and professional level.
  
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    BUS 306 - Advertising and Promotion


    Credits: (3)
    A study of advertising as a management tool to further organizational objectives including the social, economic and managerial aspects of advertising; the impact of advertising practices on the consumer; and the full promotional mix of public relations and sales promotion. Prerequisite(s): BUS 313  or permission of instructor. (As needed)
  
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    BUS 307 - Business Management and Organization


    Credits: (3)
    This course builds understanding and knowledge by examining management principles, theory and practice in the functional areas of planning, organizing, leading and evaluation. The global environment, ethical behavior, and corporate social responsibility provide the framework from which to analyze managerial challenges and decision-making. Practical application includes case analysis and current events Prerequisite(s): BUS 250  or permission of instructor; junior level standing or permission of instructor. (Fall and Spring)
  
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    BUS 309 - Money and Banking


    Credits: (3)
    History, structure and functions of commercial banking and the Federal Reserve System; an analysis of money, financial intermediaries, money and capital markets, financial innovation and recent banking legislation. An evaluation of both Keynesian and monetarist views of monetary theory and policy. Prerequisite(s): ECON 101 -ECON 102 . (Spring)
  
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    BUS 310 - International Trade, Investments and Economics


    Credits: (3)
    An introduction to the economic principles underlying international trade structures, international monetary arrangements, and international business and investment. Prerequisite(s): ECON 101 -ECON 102 . (Fall)
  
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    BUS 311 - Information Systems


    Credits: (3)
    An introduction to the essential role of information and its management in the modern corporation. Emphasis is on computer-based information systems. Surveys several topics including systems development, database, hardware and software concepts, the Internet and e-commerce, and ethical implications of information systems development. (Fall and Spring)
  
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    BUS 313 - Principles of Marketing


    Credits: (3)
    An examination of the problems faced by the marketing manager in making decisions concerning markets, products, prices, channels, promotion and basic marketing strategy. Findings from the behavioral sciences will be applied to practical marketing problems. Prerequisite(s): BUS 250  or permission of instructor; junior level standing or permission of instructor. (Fall and Spring)
  
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    BUS 319 - International Marketing


    Credits: (3)
    An examination of the strategic approach and tactical application in marketing effectively in an international environment. Emphasis on developing effective and efficient marketing channels, product approaches, promotion and pricing strategies. Discussions also directed towards market penetration, market research, uncontrollable variables, consumer perceptions and segmentation approaches in global markets. Prerequisite(s): BUS 313 . (As needed)
  
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    BUS 320 - Statistics


    Credits: (3)
    A detailed study of the principles and methods underlying the organization, analysis and interpretation of data. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability models, probability distributions, interval estimation, hypothesis testing, nonparametric methods and regression analysis. Prerequisite(s): MATH 211  (Fall and Spring)
  
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    BUS 322 - Thinking Strategically: An Introduction to Game Theory


    Credits: (3)
    An examination of game theory applications in business, economics and political science. A study of strategy in elections, legislative voting, bargaining, auctions, cooperative business ventures and economic decisions. Only high school-level math required. (As needed)
  
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    BUS 325 - Personal Finance


    Credits: (3)
    This course is designed to enlighten students on the areas of personal finance. Some of the major topics to be covered are: time, value of money, career planning, money management, tax planning, consumer credit, costs of credit, housing decisions and various insurances. (As needed)
  
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    BUS 328 - Facility and Event Management


    Credits: (3)
    An in-depth look at the practices, procedures and operations of major event and facility management, including planning, funding and managing these events. The main focus of these principles will be on sporting events and facilities, but the principles can be applied to many different areas, including corporate and social events. Prerequisite(s): BUS 127  or permission of instructor. (Spring)
  
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    BUS 329 - Business and Economics of Sports


    Credits: (3)
    Students examine the economic relationships surrounding professional and intercollegiate sports in the United States. Students develop a business plan for a professional sports franchise and manage the franchise through a number of economic environments, including salary caps, revenue sharing, insurance contracts, expansion and stadium/arena financing. They obtain a greater understanding of the market forces that shape professional leagues, the factors that determine player compensation and the relationship between economic forces and competitive balance in professional sports. Prerequisite(s): ECON 101  and ECON 102 . (Fall)
  
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    BUS 333 - Sport Marketing and Communications


    Credits: (3)
    An in-depth examination of the marketing practices, procedures and operations of professional, collegiate and recreational sport organizations and enterprises. The course also examines the relationships that exist between the media and sport organizations as well as the technology they use. Students refine their marketing skills by examining the ways in which sport marketing organizations exercise promotions, market research, sponsorship and fundraising in the sports industry. Prerequisite(s): BUS 313 . (Spring)
  
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    BUS 334 - Introduction to Non-Profit Management


    Credits: (3)
    A survey course designed to introduce students to the nonprofit sector. During this course, we will explore the history and trends of nonprofit organizations in the United States; their relationship to government, business and society; and also discuss the internationalization of the nonprofit community. This course will discuss the unique management issues related to nonprofits, including volunteerism, financial management and the key motivating factor of mission in place of profit. Throughout, the student will learn that nonprofits are held to a higher standard of ethics and in turn can influence society. (As needed)
  
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    BUS 335 - Sport Law


    Credits: (3)
    A presentation of the basic legal system, its terminology, and principles as applied to professional and amateur sport. Emphasis is on identifying and analyzing legal issues, the ramifications of those issues, and the means of limiting the liability of sport organizations. Prerequisite(s): BUS 127  or permission of instructor. (Fall)
  
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    BUS 336 - International Sport Management


    Credits: (3)
    An examination of several transformational forces in the world today: the end of communism, the global economy, the electronic village, and their impact on management within the sport industry. This course investigates the positive and negative effects that globalization has had on sport and, in turn, the positive and negative effects that the sport industry has had on the global community and how sport management professionals address these issues. (Spring)
  
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    BUS 338 - Computer Applications for Business


    Credits: (3)
    Computer Applications for Business is a unique opportunity for students to focus upon the application of information technology (i.e. computer skills) as a tool for the business professional.  Students will gain hands-on experience in the utilization of Microsoft Office 365 as a valuable tool in the creation of key business documents. Specific focus will be placed upon the attention to detail and professional best practices recommended in the production of business documents.
  
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    BUS 340 - Management Science


    Credits: (3)
    An introduction to some of the contemporary quantitative methods used in management science and economics. Topics include probability concepts, forecasting, decision theory, linear programming, queuing theory, network models, MONTE CARLO simulation and Markov analysis. Prerequisite(s): MATH 105  or BUS 320 ; BUS 311  and BUS 250  are recommended. (Fall and Spring)
  
  •  

    BUS 342 - Government Contracting I


    Credits: (3)
    Government Contracting I is a DAU Level I equivalent contracting course for contracting personnel, active military personnel and contractors who seek a basic understanding of the government contracting field. This course provides foundational knowledge of the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) System. Specifically, the course provides immersion training into the FAR; Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement (DFARS); the DFARS Procedures, Guidance, and Information (PGI); and Department of Defense (DoD) class deviations from the FAR and DFARS. (As needed)
  
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    BUS 343 - Government Contracting II


    Credits: (3)
    BUS 343 will describe the principles of contract formation that apply to all methods of contracting. Students will compare and contrast the solicitation and evaluation of offers when using sealed bidding and competitive negotiation and explore some of the procedural requirements in making a contract award. Policies and procedures pertaining to both bid protests and size status protests will be evaluated. In contract administration, students will ensure compliance with contract terms and conditions during contract performance. Effective contract administration involves tailoring the requirements to the complexity of the acquisition. After a contract is awarded, the Government and contractor respectively plan and initiate performance of the work. For the Government, this involves planning for contract administration and orienting the contractor. Prerequisite(s): BUS 342 . (As needed)
  
  •  

    BUS 344 - Operations and Supply Chain Management


    Credits: (3)
    An examination of the transformation process that converts inputs into outputs, and how it adds value to the outputs. Also investigates the concepts, insights, practical tools and decision support systems that are important for the effective managements of supply chains. Long-term strategic design issues, shorter-term tactical and operational issues are closely examined. State-of-the-art concepts of globally optimal decision making, often across traditional organizational boundaries are emphasized. Prerequisite(s): BUS 320 ; BUS 311  and BUS 250  are recommended. (Fall and Spring)
  
  •  

    BUS 347 - Data Mining I


    Credits: (3)
    Data mining explores and analyzes large datasets with the goal of discovering meaningful patterns and rules. This course focuses on the basics of data mining, visualization, performance evaluation, and prediction and classification techniques. Students will use modern data mining software to analyze datasets. Prerequisite(s): BUS 320 Statistics (3)  or its equivalent must be passed with a grade of C- or higher. (Spring)
  
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    BUS 348 - Data Mining II


    Credits: (3)
    Continues the approach of Data Mining I in exploring and analyzing large datasets with the goal of discovering meaningful patterns and rules. This course investigates additional supervised learning techniques and introduces unsupervised techniques. Additional topics, including time-series forecasting, social network analytics, and text mining, will be investigated, time permitting. Students will use modern data mining software to analyze datasets. Prerequisite(s): BUS 347 Data Mining I (3)  must be passed with a grade of C- or higher (Fall).
 

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